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Understanding Color In Photography: Using Color, Composition, And Exposure To Create Vivid Photos Bo


In the 1880s, way before digital photography and editing existed, composite portraiture was being produced using a technique that allowed multiple exposures to be taken on the same photographic plate. These days though, separate images are blended by using layers, masks, and blurs. Montages of photos, where a scene is photographed in small chunks and then combined, and multiplicity, in which a person is captured multiple times in the same scene, can also create a composite photograph. Focus stacking, where a scene is captured from different angles or points of focus and then blended into one, is another technique used to create a large depth of field.




Understanding Color In Photography: Using Color, Composition, And Exposure To Create Vivid Photos Bo


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As the exposure level is increased, the difference between the filmic and the legacy tonemapper will become more apparent. The spheres in the filmic example will continue to have shape to their color and shading, even as they appear to look brighter. The sphere using the legacy tonemapper will start to have their colors blend with the shading. The spheres become really bright as a solid color, but you can't necessarily tell that they have a high exposure value, whereas the filmic tonemapper takes this into account. The filmic response looks like a natural camera effect if you were to increase its exposure.


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